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Sunday, 22 May 2011

Golf - Beginner Basics II


What to keep in your golf bag.

There are many golf bags available, some designed for fashion, some for utility and some that combine both
features. There are big bags, bigger bags and bags so big that they would keep everything I need for a long
weekend vacation in one of the side pockets!

Generally speaking, you need a bag just large enough to hold your clubs, extra balls, your glove, tees, car
keys, extra pencils, ball markers, a ball retriever, sunscreen, a windbreaker and a large umbrella.

It is also a good idea to have a packet of tissues, a band-aid or two, and if you play courses where insects
are a problem, a can of bug repellent comes in very handy.

A small pack of baby wipes come in very handy; in your bag they get warmed by the heat, so when you get
sweaty or a sand trap covered you with sand, a nice warm wipe can be very refreshing.

I happen to be allergic to bees, hornets and wasps, so my Epipen is an important addition to my bag. I am
also hypoglycemic so I carry Lifesavers, which has to be replaced several times throughout the year because
they tend to melt.

One item that doesn’t need to be in your golf bag is your cell phone. If you must carry it, turn off the
ringer as a courtesy to other players. If you must use it, be aware of others who might be taking a swing or
putting their ball. Be considerate!

Having these items in your golf bag should provide everything you will need, even in a minor emergency
(like a blister) or a major inconvenience, like a sudden rainstorm. Being prepared makes the game a
great deal more fun.

Golf-Beginner Basics I


The popularity of golf has increased tremendously over the past forty five years, giving us champions like
Arnold Palmer, Greg Norman, and Tiger Woods, and world-renowned courses like Pinehurst, Augusta
National and the Blue Monster at Doral.

Why has golf become so popular? It’s the opportunity to be outside, to get a good whole body workout,
network with friends or business colleagues at a leisurely pace, and to play a game that you can never
perfect.

Your scorecard, over time, shows your improvement, which keeps you playing again and again.

Here is a very basic lesson in golf for the person who has no clue about the game.

Golf is played on an eighteen-hole course; each hole has its "par", which is the number of tee shots
(drives), fairway shots, chips (short hits as you approach the green), and putts.

The par number is based on the length and difficulty of the hole. Pars range from 3 to 6. If you get the
ball in the hole in five shots on a par five hole, you "made par." If it took you six shots, it’s called a
bogie, if you made it in four, it’s a birdie.

There are usually "hazards" of some sort on all the holes. Bodies of water, sand traps, and trees are
strategically placed to make the hole more challenging. Beginner golfers should seek to find courses to play that are easier to play, with fewer
hazards.

Each player keeps their own score, marking the number of total number of shots for each hole. At the end,
each person adds their scores-the lowest number is the winner.

It is important for beginner golfers to not take themselves too seriously. It takes a long time to get
good at this game; even though the professionals make it look so easy.

Take a lesson or two at the onset; it will help you develop a proper swing and help you get off to a good
start.

Remember that it’s just a game. Have fun and look at the big picture-you’re outside and you’re not at work!

Ladies Golf Attire and Fashion


I was perusing Golf for Women the other day and wondered where are the women who wear the golf attire
modeled in women’s golf magazines? I’ve never seen women, professionals included, who would dress in such expensive and outrageous clothes!

It’s easy to spend money outfitting yourself for golf. Hats, sunglasses, gloves, shirts, shorts, socks,
windbreakers and shoes all add up quickly, even if you shop the sales. Add in equipment, bag and cart and you have to play quite often to keep down the "CPU" - cost per use.

One glossy advertisement showed a model in short shorts (like that’s allowed on courses!) that cost
$275, the Tse golf shirt ($595), jacket by Ralph Lauren ($185) and two-toned Utuser shoes ($425).

That comes up to $1480; I could never hope to get the CPU on that outfit anywhere near a normal level in my
lifetime! Don’t get me wrong; I love clothes. I really love shoes, but could never afford, or want, golf
shoes that cost more than the national budget of some small countries.

Granted, you want comfortable shoes that don’t look like something your grandmother would wear, but you
can easily find less expensive and fashionable shoes.

I have several really stylish golf outfits, none of them brand name. If I totaled the cost of all of them
up it would not come up to the price of the Tse golf shirt. Personally, I’d rather have several stylish
outfits and one outrageously priced one.

If I were to wear a $1480 outfit to play golf, I would simply be too worried about getting dirty or
perspiring to play a decent round.

How to Choose Golf Shoes


Your swing will change, your accuracy and distance will improve with practice, and you’ll become deadly
with a putter, but you will always do these things while standing on your feet.

Your feet need to be comfortable! Have you ever developed a blister while walking or running? It’s all
you can think about and it ruins the experience. Don’t let uncomfortable shoes ruin your golf game.

This is one area where you shouldn’t let your frugality make the decision for you. You will be
wearing these shoes many times and they should be considered an investment.

Comfort should be your biggest concern when buying shoes. Your foot should not move at all on your heel
when you walk, yet your toes shouldn’t feel cramped. Have you shoes professional fit to your feet and walk
around in them before you buy them.

Proper golf shoes should be waterproof so that your feet remain dry in damp conditions. Good socks are
important too; they will wick perspiration away from you feet, keeping your feet dry and comfortable.

All golf courses prohibit metal spiked shoes in the effort to protect their delicate greens. Purchase
shoes that allow you to change the rubber spikes easily, and while you’re there, purchase some extras.
You never know when you might lose one. Replace the spikes when they become worn.

With all the things you have to worry about while playing golf, your feet shouldn’t be one of them. When
it comes to golf footwear, quality counts.

Choosing Golf Equipment


Buying golf equipment can be like dumping money into a money pit, but armed with some knowledge you can save time and money in selecting the right clubs for yourself. As with most things in life, you can spend a lot or you can spend a little several times before you get what you really need.

If you are first starting out and not completely sure you want to commit to this addictive game, you should
either rent clubs at the golf course, or buy a starter set of clubs.

Buying a set of started clubs enables you to become accustomed to them; enabling you to concentrate on
your swing instead of wondering how this set of miss-matched clubs you just rented are going to work
out.

As you become better at the game, you should invest in a better set of clubs, fitted to you.

Generally, a set includes a driver, one or two fairway woods, 4-9 irons, a wedge or two and perhaps a putter.

As you become more experienced and start thinking about new clubs, you may want to consider buying your
driver separately. Some players want a driver to give them more accuracy; some need the distance.

There are numerous balls available and the box will usually have a chart on the back and direct you to the
right ball for your needs. As you learn the game and get better at it, you should experiment with different
balls which could improve your accuracy or distance.

Having the right equipment is an important aspect of the game; buy wisely!

Wednesday, 18 May 2011

Getting the Most from Golf Lessons


Getting the Most from Golf Lessons

It’s never easy asking for help, but in golf, it is 

almost a necessity. Unfortunately, we often ask our


buddies and partners, when in reality we should take a 
lesson or two.


We think that a Pro would critique harshly, but they 
are honest, positive and very helpful.


Lessons at the local course aren’t as expensive as you 
might think and they are worth it because your game 
will improve rapidly and cause you less frustration, 
making the game much more enjoyable for you.


Of utmost importance, is being honest about your game. 
The Pro will ask you what you want to start with;
driving, chipping, putting or whatever you feel you

need help with.


Listen carefully and follow the instructions. You may 
have doubts if the Pro changes your stance, your grip 
or your swing; the Pro knows best.



Don’t hesitate to ask questions. Don’t worry about if 
the question or concern in stupid-they’ve heard it all 
before and will not make you feel like an idiot for 
asking. If you don’t "get it", tell him/her that 
you’re not getting it. You should never walk away from 
a lesson with unanswered questions.


You can concentrate on one thing during a lesson, or 
several. You might start with a lesson in driving; get 
the right grip, the right stance, the right swing, the 
right follow-through in one lesson, and then practice 
it. Next time, you might work on your short game, or 
putting.


You’ve invested in the equipment, doesn’t it make 
sense to learn how to use them to their advantage and 
improve your abilities?



Choosing Golf Equipment

Buying golf equipment can be like dumping money into a 
money pit, but armed with some knowledge you can save 
time and money in selecting the right clubs for 
yourself. As with most things in life, you can spend a 
lot or you can spend a little several times before you 
get what you really need.


If you are first starting out and not completely sure
you want to commit to this addictive game, you should 
either rent clubs at the golf course, or buy a starter 
set of clubs.


Buying a set of started clubs enables you to become 
accustomed to them; enabling you to concentrate on 
your swing instead of wondering how this set of 
miss-matched clubs you just rented are going to work 
out.


As you become better at the game, you should invest in 
a better set of clubs, fitted to you.


Generally, a set includes a driver, one or two fairway 
woods, 4-9 irons, a wedge or two and perhaps a putter.


As you become more experienced and start thinking 
about new clubs, you may want to consider buying your 
driver separately. Some players want a driver to give 
them more accuracy; some need the distance.


There are numerous balls available and the box will 
usually have a chart on the back and direct you to the 
right ball for your needs. As you learn the game and 
get better at it, you should experiment with different 
balls which could improve your accuracy or distance.


Having the right equipment is an important aspect of 
the game; buy wisely!